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Correcting Color

Discussion in 'Lightroom General Discussion (ARCHIVE)' started by bigbob, Jul 4, 2008.

  1. bigbob

    bigbob Active Member

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    Has anyone used AUTO WB with any success? Is there any numbers for RGB that can be used to determined proper skin tone? I know in Photoshop using CMYK if the Y is 5 or 6
    Percent higher then M the skin tone should look good. I am color blind so I rely on the numbers and my wife. I also have a plug-in called skin tone. It helps determine good skin tone. Lightroom is a visual program it’s hard for me to tell if the color is correct. Does anyone have any ideas on how to tell if color is right? Bob
     
  2. Denis Pagé

    Denis Pagé Lightroom Guru Lightroom Guru

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    One day, wanting some grass being removed in my garden, I painted a trace of the pattern with fluorescent-orange (like they do for roadworks) to show my wife' son where to cut. Coming to check later, I saw him cutting feets away!!! Then I knew he was color blind. So, I understand your problem...

    There are no magic numbers and flesh color is far from the same from one person to the next. That said, THERE IS A SOLUTION for you! :D

    Go at the photographer's store and buy a "Gray Card". Then, when taking photos, either include the grey card in the frame or take a picture of it alone for the first shots. And do not forget to redo each time the lighting conditions change. As for the setting on camera, set WB to auto.

    Once your images are imported in Lightroom, select all images taken under a given same lighting condition (from first gray card shot to before the next), pick the EyeDropper tool above left of the "Temp" "Tint" and just click on the gray card in you image.

    Even if you are working in Lightroom wearing Pink eyeglasses, you will be spot on! ;)
     
  3. bigbob

    bigbob Active Member

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    Correct color

    Denis,
    Thanks for the reply. I do use a gray card when I'm shooting. My problems is when I edit weddings for other photographers. I suggest they use gray card but it rarely happens. Just thought there might be help out there. Bob
     
  4. Denis Pagé

    Denis Pagé Lightroom Guru Lightroom Guru

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    Ah! For other photographers...

    Well, in this case, use the white dresses just like a gray card. This will work unless the bride is wearing a tinted dress. Or use flowers you know white, napkins, tablecloths...
     
  5. Victoria Bampton

    Victoria Bampton Lightroom Queen / Owner Staff Member Administrator Moderator Lightroom Guru

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    Of course you could sit down and work out what the RGB-16-bit-% equivalent is for the CMYK numbers you usually use, and then you can still work by the numbers.
     

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